Thickeners & Anti Sag

Epoxy is not an “Old World Craftsmanship in a Can”. A tight joint is superior to a wide one in every respect, but when fill is required, epoxy can do the job. To prevent resin from running out of the spaces before it has cured, an anti-sage agent must be used.


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Cold Cure Fact Sheet

This is the Rolls Royce of epoxy resins; a real problem solver! As a sealer it has excellent penetrating properties, with no fire risk from solvent. As a laminating resin it allows a tough but not brittle lay-up, even in temperatures too low for conventional epoxies; mostly due to their slow curing times and the thicker viscosity at lower temperatures. A wide variety of fillers may be used in conjunction with Cold-Cure. I may be thickened with talc to a consistency that is workable for the application. Higher temperatures provide convenient fast rapid work glue. As a glue it is thin enough to mix and work at temperatures as low as 2 degrees. Being absolutely insensitive to moisture once mixed it will cure and bond underwater. Just remember to mix in correct ration of 2 parts resin to 1 part hardener. (Note: Stolen from Industrial Formulators of...
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Cold Cure Epoxy

Features: Cold-Cure has been one of the latest break-through in epoxy resin technology. The disadvantages of the earlier systems have been overcome. Studies were completed to provide the quality need to be used in adverse conditions for a variety of applications. Low Temperatures: An outstanding feature it the ability to remain workable and cure in temperatures just above freezing. Most resins are so viscous (thickened) at low temperatures they are extremely hard to pour in correct proportions, to be mixed and applied. Cold-Cure has a low enough viscosity that it enables pouring and working easy, even in cold temperature. Wet Conditions: One major drawback of standard epoxies is the fact that the hardener will react with any moisture rather than the epoxy, thereby destroying he hardener. The unique quality of Cold-Cure is that displaces the water and prefers to interact with the hardener, giving a bond to wet wood and damp fiberglass and even underwater surfaces. Flexibility: The older rapid curing epoxies had a design flaw that became a major draw back – that of the resulting reacting was so extreme that it produced a very brittle product. The current Cold-Cure product is flexible making it ideal for use with wood. 100% Solids: Cold-Cure is 100% solids (no solvents) which means it is completely waterproof and moisture vapor proof. Safety: Cold-Cure is very mild compared to some of the other systems available. There is low skin irritation, and being solvent free there is no danger of explosion. Thorough cleanliness should always be practiced, using soap and water for hands and acetone or laquer thinner for tools. (Note: Stolen from Industrial Formulators Marine...
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Cold Cure Epoxy Application

Proportioning: Is an easy 2:1 ratio.  The warmer the temperature, the less working time and the faster the cure will be. Varying the amount of hardener will not speed up or retard the cure.  The 2 to 1 ratio must always remain accurate (use a measuring cup). Mix the two components very thoroughly, it is ready to apply.  Working time for one litre at 70 degrees F. or 20 deg. C is about 20 minutes and is fully cured in 6 – 8 hours.  Take into account that the colder the temperature, the longer the working time, and the slower the cure time.  Sealer and Adhesive: Great for tight joints, just spread with a brush or spatula; there is no need for clamping, just enough support to hold the pieces together until set.  Due to cold-Cure’s high penetration into wood, we recommend applying some of the mixed resin to both surfaces to be glued first. This is because it soaks into the wood and does not leave enough on the surface to completely wet out the opposite surface, resulting in a resin starved joint. Gap Filler: When using as a gap filler (for misaligned joints, spaces, cracks and holes) or gluing a vertical surface; Cold-Cure should be thickened with a non-sagging agent like talc or cabosil. This will assist in extending the coverage. Any large filling job should have sawdust or other available filler to add for thickening so that it does not run.  Once mixed thoroughly, add your filler slowly, so it does not clump and take care that all the filler particles are moistened with the resin. Keep adding filler until it peaks like whipped cream.  Thickened Cold-Cure will be stronger that the surface being filled. Sheathing: Cold-Cure for sheathing is an excellent, tough, flexible and impact –resistant resin for all fiberglass cloth; for example: roving (18oz), chopped matte (1.5 oz), veil (light weight), dynel (acrylic) and kevlar (nylon). Due to the starch binder in fiberglass materials it is not recommended for corners or curves because epoxies do not contain the styrene necessary to bread down the starch binder as do polyester resins.  See tabbing for corners. (Note: excerpts from Industrial Formulators of Canada...
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Will Gelcoat Adhere To Epoxy?

Epoxy is considered to be the choice for many marine repairs. Yet, the question often arises of ‘how well will gelcoat adhere to it?’ To have success there a couple of issues to be aware of, basically there are three issues of why gelcoat will not cure on epoxy, all related to the hardener chemistry. Epoxy hardeners are basically a blend of amines, which can end the chain reaction of the radical molecule that is the base of polyester and vinylester cure chemistry. Therefore mixing carefully is a must, as is preparing the epoxy so that there are no un-reacted amines to interfere with the cure. Over-all gelcoat bonds to epoxy quite well. The first problem situation is under-cured epoxy. If gelcoat is applies to epoxy before it is fully cured, the contact with the un-reacted amines halts the curing process. The second situation would be that the epoxy was not mixed at the correct ratio, so that it is hardened rich, and leaving un-reacted amines free to interfere. The third issue is commonly called ‘blush’ or amine blush. This is a surface phenomena that is a reaction of the amine molecules at the surface; a reaction with the carbon dioxide in the air. It forms easily in the presence of moisture, especially humid environments; so avoid working in cool damp locations. Any amine hardener has the potential to blush, regardless of the chemistry, but is very easy to deal with because it is water soluble. Simply wash with clean water to remove the blush using no soap or solvents. Then sand the area with 80- grit to provide the gelcoat with a textured surface for best adhesion. Be sure to use a gelcoat that is waxed. Gelcoat does bond well to a properly cured and prepared epoxy surface. (Note: information taken from an excerpt by Technical Services West Systems...
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